You are here

Feature Story

Does the Common Core cover all the skills your students need?

 
The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) provide a well-organized framework to “help ensure that all students are college and career ready in literacy no later than the end of high school.”1 By design, the CCSS are focused on “results rather than means,”2 leaving educators to determine the processes for developing the specific skills needed to achieve these goals.

In addressing handwriting and keyboarding, the CCSS state the following:

  • By the end of first grade, students will demonstrate the ability to print all upper- and lowercase letters.3
  • By the end of fourth grade, students will display sufficient command of keyboarding skills to type a minimum of one page in a single sitting.4

The national discourse around handwriting instruction in particular has been elevated since the release of the CCSS. In response to this concern, researchers and educators gathered last January in Washington, DC, for Handwriting in the 21st Century? An Educational Summit. This Summit further crystallized the need for educators and policy makers to give handwriting and keyboarding serious thought.

The resulting recommended national Written-Language Production Standards offer developmentally appropriate, research–based indicators to integrate handwriting and keyboarding—two essential skills for 21st century success—into the curriculum.

 

How the Written-Language Production Standards were developed

 
The Written-Language Production Standards are research-based and incorporate

  • basic letter formation and keyboarding indicators included in the Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts.
  • national and local technology standards and policy.
  • state handwriting and keyboarding standards.
  • studies in motor skills development from occupational therapists.
  • data on language (written and oral) and brain activation from academic researchers.

The initial, proposed standards were posted for public review and feedback in April and May of 2012. After careful consideration and revision, the resulting standards incorporate much of this feedback from educators, occupational therapists, and other concerned citizens and are stronger for it.

The Written-Language Production Standards will continue to be a living document and evolve as forthcoming research about best practices in handwriting and keyboarding instruction is released and as changes in the educational landscape demand.

To learn more, download the standards and view this informative video: “Why Handwriting is Important.”

 
 

1 National Governors Association Center for Best Practices, Council of Chief State School Officers.
       “English Language Arts Standards: K–5,” Washington D.C.: 2010.
National Governors Association Center for Best Practices, Council of Chief State School Officers.
       “Key Design Considerations: K–5,” Washington D.C.: 2010.
3 National Governors Association Center for Best Practices, Council of Chief State School Officers.
       “Language Standards: K–5,” Washington D.C.: 2010.
4 National Governors Association Center for Best Practices, Council of Chief State School Officers.
       “College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Writing: K–5,” Washington D.C.: 2010.

 

            © Zaner-Bloser, Inc. All Rights Reserved.      Privacy Policy